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Speed bump regulations

Speed bump regulations
08/11/2018

Do you know what the Speed bump regulations are? Speed bumps can be used on both public and private roads to reduce traffic and accidents in problem areas. If your private road is being used as a shortcut or thoroughfare and is excessively busy, or you have noticed a lot of accidents and/or dangerous driving on your road then you might want to think about speed bumps. Councils and highway bodies will also take the initiative to install speed bumps typically in high-risk areas such as schools or roads with high pedestrian footfall.

While speed bumps can be used to make roads safer, they can potentially make areas even more dangerous if they’re not used correctly. The Highways (Road Humps) Regulations 1999 outlines some of the legal conditions that speed bumps need to meet to stay safe, while councils and other experienced bodies also outline some recommendations and best practices to ensure safety.

Informing people Before installing speed bumps, it is a legal requirement to inform and consult with the chief officer of police and emergency services such as fire brigade and ambulance services. Emergency services will need to change their route or inform the relevant people and if the road in question is a main and only route for emergency services the speed hump system may not possible.

It’s also a legal requirement to inform any organisations or groups representing people that may be affected by the speed hump system such as bus operators, transport services and residents or traders in the street. If you’re on a private road and are planning on installing speed humps you should inform and consult with other residents on your street to make sure they approve of the plans.

Dimensions All roads are different, and you may need different speed bump lengths depending on the carriageway, but all speed bumps must be a minimum of 900mm in length according to The Highways (Road Humps) Regulations 1999. The height of speed humps must also be a minimum of 25mm but no more than 100mm at the highest point. Additionally, no vertical face of any material forming part of the speed hump should exceed 6mm measured vertically from top to bottom of that face.

To ensure safety and limit the possibility of vehicle grounding, speed bumps should also not be at a steeper gradient than 1:10. You may need to look at shallower gradients depending on other considerations such as the presence of buses, whether emergency services use the route regularly, the incline of the road and so on. Severe speed bumps that reduce car speeds to 10mph or less may only be used on private roads and are not permitted on public highways.

For more information on  Speed bump regulations  talk to  The Ramp People

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